Email Signature Myth Busting! Shouldn’t I Worry About Logo Attachments?

Email Signature Myth Busting! Shouldn’t I Worry About Logo Attachments? In this series of email signature myth busting, we discuss the popular consensus that images which are embedded in your email signature will automatically be converted into a logo attachment on the recipient’s end. Read further to learn the truth of the matter. As always, […]

Published: 5/1/2015 by Eric Kotchi

Email Signature Myth Busting! Shouldn’t I Worry About Logo Attachments?

In this series of email signature myth busting, we discuss the popular consensus that images which are embedded in your email signature will automatically be converted into a logo attachment on the recipient’s end. Read further to learn the truth of the matter. As always, we’re here to bust some myths about email signature logo attachment and email signature images!

Myth #4: A paper clip will appear in my message if I include an image (logo attachment).

Verdict: NOT TRUE.

What is true is that this may occur if you incorrectly format your email signature. Again, read all of our email signature myths to get a good grasp of how your email signatures should be formatted. If you do not follow our guidelines, it is certainly possible that an image in your email signature will show up as a logo attachment, with a paper clip icon. It will likely result in the email being too large as well. Remember though, this isn’t because you included an image – it’s because your email signature is formatted incorrectly.

With Xink, your recipients will only see an attachment (and especially logo attachment) if there is an attachment. Period. Improperly formatted email signatures will trigger Outlook to show emails with attachments, but Xink prevents this.

One thing that is worth noting is that even though you may format the email properly, you never know what will happen to your email after you send it. Here are some examples of what can occur:

  • Your email may be converted to plain text when received. Unfortunately, there is really not much you can do about this. You have to accept that some companies have completely out-of-date system administrators who probably have been in their position since the times when sending html emails was considered extremely “dangerous.” Accept it till he or she finds another job as a mainframe administrator somewhere. This should not prevent you from sending beautiful emails.
  • Recipients may see both missing images and logo attachments if replying to emails using the built-in mailbox app on iPhones. The solution (for you or the recipient): Use another email app! The built-in email app on iPhones is lacking in features and functionality, and it is tedious to use compared with other mail apps. With the OWA App for iPhone for Office 365, for example, replies to emails keep the formatting and images as they should appear. Well done! Problems with logo attachment is gone.
  • The recipient may reply with a poorly formatted email signature. Obvious! If the recipient replies with a poor email signature, it can destroy yours as well. But at least you have done your part by ensuring the stability of the email communication and your brand impression. Some things in life can’t be helped!

As you can see, images in email signatures don’t have to be your enemy and adding an image does not trigger the logo attachment to show. In fact, quite the contrary – they can be your friend! Don’t worry about adding images to your email any longer!

Add Images to Your Email Signature with Confidence

The four myths busted in this series of blog posts should help you realize that you can design beautiful and engaging email signatures – email signatures which are compelling and have good calls to action. It can be done!

It is not a trivial task to make a fantastic brand impression via your email signature, but if you’re in a marketing position, you already know this. Your company’s everyday email signatures represent the most brand impressions that you can dream of. Don’t squander that opportunity.

Just go ahead and get started!

See our previous myth-busting posts: