Email Signature Spam Folder Myth – Will Emails End Up here?

Email Signature Spam Folder Myth – Will Emails End Up here In this week’s signature for email myth busting article series, we discuss the dreaded spam folder – that bottomless pit of unwanted, unused, and downright dangerous email messages! Is it really true that images in your email signature will send them straight to the […]

Published: 4/30/2015 by Eric Kotchi

Email Signature Spam Folder Myth – Will Emails End Up here

In this week’s signature for email myth busting article series, we discuss the dreaded spam folder – that bottomless pit of unwanted, unused, and downright dangerous email messages! Is it really true that images in your email signature will send them straight to the spam folder? At least many people think that if you include any type of image in an email signature, you’ve just booked your email message a first-class ticket to the trash can. What do you think? You may be surprised to find out the truth! Let’s bust the email signature spam folder myth.

Myth #3: Emails signatures with images go straight to the spam folder.

Verdict: ABSOLUTELY NOT.

First read Myths #1 and #2 to understand what happens when people create email signatures themselves, then return to this myth buster.

The main reasons that email signatures end up in spam folders have already been described. Email signatures must be properly coded and properly made in order for them to pass muster.

So how come even properly formatted and properly generated email signatures can end up as spam anyways, known as email signature spam? Well… basically because of unauthorized or illegal activities on your part. Follow these basic principles, and you can help ensure your email messages get through:

  • Don’t add a linked image to your email signature if you have also embedded images. Adding a linked image to your email signature in addition to an embedded image can trigger the spam filters to raise a flag. Normally they don’t, but if you add several images from several external locations, you’re likely to trigger email signature spam.
  • Don’t link to images with strange names. If you link to an image with a very long or strange system-generated name, it can trigger a spam filter as well. Make sure that the image name is logical and that the url is not too long.
  • Don’t link to images that are located on multiple domains. Some spam filters quarantine your emails if they contain links to multiple sites. You can, without any issue, link to images or landing pages on another url – that isn’t an issue. But don’t trigger a spam filter by linking to 10 different sites in your email signature. That’s bad practice, hence triggering email signature spam.

If you haven’t figured it out by now, let us reiterate. You can and should include images in your email signatures. And you should make sure that your employees are doing the same thing by making use of effective email signature management like Xink. If done properly, your company’s email messages will not go to the spam folder and you will avoid email signature spam!

We’re Not Done Yet!

There’s still more myths regarding email signatures to come! As you can see, the disinformation about email signatures, formatting, use of imaging, and best practices seems to have no end. Stay tuned for more myth busting!

See our previous myth-busting posts: